misandry-mermaid
rosefire:

gaywitch-practisingabortion:

situationalstudent:

purplespacecats:

professorbutterscotch:

kiskolee:

THIS.

I have never thought about it in this context
that’s actually really, really creepy.

I… fuck.

Yeah, basically.

I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.

rosefire:

gaywitch-practisingabortion:

situationalstudent:

purplespacecats:

professorbutterscotch:

kiskolee:

THIS.

I have never thought about it in this context

that’s actually really, really creepy.

I… fuck.

Yeah, basically.

I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.

survivorsupport

thepoliticalfreakshow:

An unprecedented number of colleges and universities were accused in 2013 of mishandling sexual assault cases, but the only people who know exactly which schools were accused are a handful of attorneys and their staff at the U.S. Department of Education.

In the absence of an official report, The Huffington Post tracked the colleges that are under investigation, face complaints or have received significant criticism for their handling of sexual violence on campus, and plotted them in the map below.

In fiscal year 2013, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights received 30 complaints against colleges and universities alleging failures in the way the schools handled cases of sexual violence. That was nearly double the previous year’s tally of 17.

The complaints that the OCR received include allegations specifically related to sexual violence and failures to address them under the gender equity law Title IX, the Education Department disclosed to The Huffington Post. However, the Education Department does not publicly disclose a list of all colleges that are under investigation.

A group of 39 lawmakers penned a letter to the department Wednesday asking that it become more transparent in this regard.

Since Oct. 1 of last year, OCR has already received 13 complaints alleging Title IX violations, making a total of 60 in less than three years.

Colleges and universities receiving federal funding — which is nearly all of them — are required under Title IX to respond to incidents of sexual misconduct, assault and harassment on campus, and to have policies in place that attempt to prevent such incidents. The OCR is tasked with enforcing Title IX, and it can open an investigation either proactively or in response to a complaint.

Nearly two dozen schools are currently under investigation, with at least 11 the result of complaints filed by students, faculty and recent alumni. Between 2009 and the present, the OCR opened another 11 proactive investigations with a specific focus on Title IX sexual violence.

If the OCR opens an investigation and finds fault on the part of the higher education institution, the agency often attempts to reach a resolution agreement where it lays out policy reforms the college or university should take. Such an agreement was reached at Yale University in 2012 and at the State University of New York system in 2013. Alternatively, the OCR may refer the case to the U.S. Department of Justice.

In extreme cases, the agency can cut off a school from all federal funding, including Pell grants and student loans. This has never happened.

Click on the list of names or the points on the map to see the schools accused of mishandling sexual assault cases:

Map by Tyler Kingkade/The Huffington Post

We are in charge of our own bodies

Upon learning that I had sex with my boyfriend, my mother responds with “you’ve given him everything”. No, actually, all I’ve ever given him is a kickass cooler and the pleasure of my company. 

Virginity is a social construct, ladies. Don’t let others slut-shame you. We are in charge of our own bodies and we shouldn’t have to explain our decisions to other people. 

survivorsupport
whoneedsfeminism:

"I need feminism because when a girl was sexually assaulted by her boyfriend while she was asleep, people told her she was overreacting, it wasn’t an assault because he’s her boyfriend, and it’s just the way men are, and it was her own fault if she didn’t let him have sex often enough. Both men and women said this. One woman even said the girl shouldn’t tell him that it wasn’t okay to do this, she shouldn’t call him a rapist, this would hurt him, since he "isn’t a real rapist" as her boyfriend. If it’s your partner, it isn’t rape, apparently? Seriously?"

whoneedsfeminism:

"I need feminism because when a girl was sexually assaulted by her boyfriend while she was asleep, people told her she was overreacting, it wasn’t an assault because he’s her boyfriend, and it’s just the way men are, and it was her own fault if she didn’t let him have sex often enough. Both men and women said this. One woman even said the girl shouldn’t tell him that it wasn’t okay to do this, she shouldn’t call him a rapist, this would hurt him, since he "isn’t a real rapist" as her boyfriend. If it’s your partner, it isn’t rape, apparently? Seriously?"

thenewwomensmovement

commandereyebrows:

sixpenceee:

This is glorious and even thought it doesn’t fit in the range of all the paranormal & science, I MUST share

It works like this: You tell Kitestring that you’re in a dangerous place or situation, and give it a time frame of when to check in on you. If you don’t reply back when it checks your status, it’ll alert your emergency contacts with a custom message you set up.

It doesn’t require you to touch anything (like bSafe) or shake your phone (like Nirbhaya) to send the distress signal. Kitestring is smarter, because it doesn’t need an action to alert people, it needs inaction.

MORE INFORMATION

reblogging because this is seriously amazing.